Language Arts — Tips and Tricks!

Affect and effect are easy to mix up. Here’s the short version of how to use affect vs. effect. Affect is usually a verb, and it means to impact or change. Effect is usually a noun, an effect is the result of a change. Watch out! There are certain situations and fixed phrases that break the general usage rules for these words.



 
 


 

 

The Trick to Never Confuse Maybe and May Be Again

Again, the easiest way to make sure you’re using these correctly is to replay “maybe” with “potentially” and “may be” with “might be.” If the sentence is still correct, you’re good. If it’s not, then you know you need to change it.

Extinction (Art and Science Posterboard Project)

Have your child select ANY EXTINCT animal in history. If they’d rather explore an extinct insect or flower, let them. This project allows them to explore history and hopefully learn a thing or two. 🙂

After they gather their information, have them display their new-found knowledge on a poster board. If they’d rather ake a slideshow, that’s okay, let them. 

 

Possible questions for project

  1. scientific name
  2. common name (often used) 
  3. color
  4. size
  5. weight
  6. name 3 charactetistics
  7. located
  8. diet
  9. extinction date
  10. closest relative
  11. name 3 interesting facts 
  12. lifespan

 

 Ask your child to draw a picture of their animal, insect, or flower. 
And as always, don’t forget your name! 🙂

 

Time to edit! (Language Arts)

Please familiarize yourself with the editing symbols before beginning the worksheets. If you don’t have a printer, you can have your child list the errors on a sheet of paper. Yes, there’s an answer sheet. 🙂

 

 

ANSWER KEY

 

If you want more editing pages in future posts, please tell me in a comment below. THANKS! 

Book utilized

 

Week Three: Spelling

I’m not sure if anyone is using the spelling lessons or not. If you are, please comment on the post. If no one is using them, I’ll exchange the spelling lessons for another item. Thanks! 

 

Day One

Spelling list – words with the short and long “a” vowel sounds

**First day, go over each spelling word with your child. Make sure they can pronounce and understand the meaning of each one. For in-class work, have them copy each word correctly. **

 

Day Two

 

Day Three

 

Day Four

 

Day Five: Spelling Test! 

 

Book utilized in this week’s lesson: 
Evan-Moor, Building Spelling Skills: Amazon Link

 

Answer Key:

D2:
(long o) although, poem, moment, goalie, ceremony, approach, poetry, stowaway, envelope, antelope
(short o) molecule, obstacle, trolley, proverb, oxygen, obstinate
1. 3
2. 2
3. 3
4. 2
5. 2
6. 3
7. 4
8. 3
9. 3
10. 3
11. 2
12. 2

D3:
1. officer, obstacle, stowaway
2. poem or proverb, ceremony, envelope
3. Although, goalie, moment
4. often, proverb or poem
5. trolley
6. obstinate, antelope

D4:

List Two: Vocabulary

This week’s vocabulary words were supplied by…


Amazon Link

  1. vigilant
  2. sensible
  3. absurd
  4. cringe
  5. inconspicuous
  6. bountiful
  7. novice
  8. prior
  9. invincible
  10. emphasize 
     

    Day 1: write out definitions
    Day 2:
    pick 5 and use them each in a sentence
    Day 3:
    write a synonym or antonym for each
    Day 4:
    study for the test
    Day 5:
    test (see photos below) –  Give the test verbally or print the images.
     

    Answer Key: 

    2.2:
    1.L 2.R 3. Y 4. Y 5. H 6. A 7. P 8. S 9. L 10. U  (Niagara Falls)

    2.3
    1. U 2. I 3. O 4. G 5. N 6. F 7. S 8. D 9. T 10. A (St. Augustine, Florida)

 

Week One: Vocabulary

This week’s vocabulary words were supplied by…


Amazon Link

 

  1. adequate
  2. fickle
  3. humility
  4. loathe
  5. flamboyant
  6. versatile
  7. torrid
  8. vicious
  9. opponent
  10. serene

 

Day 1: write out definitions
Day 2:
pick 5 and use them each in a sentence
Day 3:
write a synonym or antonym for each
Day 4:
study for the test
Day 5:
test (see photo below) –  Give the test verbally or print the image. 

Answers: 
1. P
2. A
3. S
4. E
5. E
6. E
7. A
8. C
9. H
10. Y

Write Book Reviews

I’ve asked my daughter to write up a review on whatever book she just read in the past. Sometimes she gets so excited about telling me about a book and asks if she can read it to me. I love seeing my child excited about reading, not just the latest video on Youtube. 🙂

To assist your child with their first book review, I have put a single-page template below. You can drag it onto your desktop and print the page. If you don’t have a printer, you could always just handwrite each section. 

If you want to take the book review one step further, have your child collect their thoughts/notes and create a 3-5 paragraph book report. Then, they can read it aloud to you. 

Hope this helps you and your kiddos! 

**You will have to finagle with your print settings to get the template to fill the entire paper.**

 

If you have access to a printer, move each image to your desktop. Make sure and select “scale to fit” before printing the images or they’ll print itty bitty.**