Should I stay or should I go?

I wonder, after seeing my post’s title, how many people are singing The Clash’s popular tune. I sure am. 😀

The reason for today’s post is for me to see how many people are utilizing the information on the site — if I should keep this site up. 

If this site is used by folks, it’ll stay. If it’s not, well, I think it’s time to go. 

So…

No stay comments = this site will be gone in November. 

 

Honor Awards

Just because your child isn’t attending public school, that doesn’t mean they don’t deserve an award for all their hard work. If you have access to a printer, surprise them with an honor’s award

. High Honor Roll

 

 

This website —> Certificate Street <—- has FREE pdfs so you can select and personalize an award for your child(ren). 

 

FREE Science Resources

Generation Genius
The site has videos aimed at K-8

After you select the video you like to watch, you’ll be redirected to a new scene. There, you’ll have everything you need to teach the topic: video, discussion questions, reading material, DIY activity guide, lesson plan, teacher’s guide, and assessment (quiz). 

 

Looking for science experiments?
Check out Sick Science! Youtube Channel.

Another great site is this —–> Steve Spangler Science.

 

Weareteachers.com  has valuable ideas/ activities as well. Check it out! 

 

Week Three: Spelling

I’m not sure if anyone is using the spelling lessons or not. If you are, please comment on the post. If no one is using them, I’ll exchange the spelling lessons for another item. Thanks! 

 

Day One

Spelling list – words with the short and long “a” vowel sounds

**First day, go over each spelling word with your child. Make sure they can pronounce and understand the meaning of each one. For in-class work, have them copy each word correctly. **

 

Day Two

 

Day Three

 

Day Four

 

Day Five: Spelling Test! 

 

Book utilized in this week’s lesson: 
Evan-Moor, Building Spelling Skills: Amazon Link

 

Answer Key:

D2:
(long o) although, poem, moment, goalie, ceremony, approach, poetry, stowaway, envelope, antelope
(short o) molecule, obstacle, trolley, proverb, oxygen, obstinate
1. 3
2. 2
3. 3
4. 2
5. 2
6. 3
7. 4
8. 3
9. 3
10. 3
11. 2
12. 2

D3:
1. officer, obstacle, stowaway
2. poem or proverb, ceremony, envelope
3. Although, goalie, moment
4. often, proverb or poem
5. trolley
6. obstinate, antelope

D4:

Week Two: Spelling

DAY ONE

Spelling list – words with the short and long “e” vowel sounds

  • hockey
  • received
  • neither
  • believe
  • achievement
  • equality
  • referee
  • pleasant
  • illegal
  • nominee
  • electricity
  • frequent
  • entry
  • eagerly 
  • pique
  • abbreviate
  • tedious
  • (two bonus words, your choice)

**First day, go over each spelling word with your child. Make sure they can pronounce and understand the meaning of each one. For in-class work, have them copy each word correctly. **

 

DAY TWO

 

DAY THREE 

 

DAY FOUR

DAY FIVE – Spelling Test! 

 

 

Book utilized in this week’s lesson: 
Evan-Moor, Building Spelling Skills: Amazon Link

 

ANSWER KEY

Day Two

 

Day Three

1. referee, hockey, illegal
2. Neither, believe
3. received, achievemnet
4. eagerly, easel
5. frequent, electricity
6. nominee, equality

 

Day Four

 

 

First Science Project: Unit – Earth and Space

Design a Planet 

Possible art supplies needed for the planet’s construction: Styrofoam ball, paints, brushes, sequence, glue, construction paper, markers, skewer and carboard (for rings), and pom poms. I’m sure I miss some items. You might not even use all of the above mentioned, and that’s okay.

Along with the construction portion of the project, you’ll need to complete an oral presentation. All the information can be delivered through a slideshow, poster board, mini book, or brochure. It’s your choice so have fun with it. Below is a list of questions to help you create the information on your planet. Can’t wait to see your final project!! 

 

1.) Planet’s name?

2.) How close or far away is YOUR PLANET from OUR Earth or Sun?

3.) Which galaxy would you find it? If you’re “discovering a new planet,” you can “discover” a new galaxy too. 🙂

4.) Color? Size (Diameter)?

5.) Length of a year ____________________ days/Earth years?

6.) Average temperature?

7.) Number of moons? Suns?

8.) Population?

9.) Weather conditions?

10.) Terrain? Type of planet (gas, ice, dwarf, rocky, etc)?

11.) Life forms? Describe them.

12.) How does your planet compare to Earth?

13.) List any additional information you want, such as fun facts.

14.) Don’t forget to include your name! 

Week One: Spelling

School (remote and in-person learning) starts next week for our district. Therefore, I am busy creating lesson plans for this quarter. I’m trying to make this homeschooling experience as normal as possible for my child. It’s going to be challenging for us, and for you. I hope the weekly spelling lessons help ease some of the tension, worry, stress, and anxiety in your home. 

Feel free to copy/paste/print any of the material below. 

 

Day One

Spelling list – words with the short and long “a” vowel sounds

  • plague
  • straight
  • freighter
  • waist
  • agent
  • acre
  • mayor
  • obey
  • restrain
  • campaign
  • persuade
  • survey
  • anticipate
  • famous
  • fragile
  • axle
  • aunt
  • aptitude
  • (two bonus words, your choice)

**First day, go over each spelling word with your child. Make sure they can pronounce and understand the meaning of each one. For in-class work, have them copy each word correctly. **

 

Day Two

Word Study

  • List spelling words that have the sound of the long a
  • Then circle the letters that make the long a sound.

 

Rhyme Time

  • Write the spelling word that rhymes with  these words
  1. taste _____________________________
  2. weight ____________________________
  3. later ______________________________
  4. afraid _______________________________

Syllable 

  • Mark the syllable division with a slash /
  1. fragile
  2. survey
  3. campaign
  4. refrain
  5. obey
  6. agent
  7. famous 
  8. acre

Day Three

 

Day Four 

 

Day Five: Spelling Test! 

 

Book utilized in this week’s lesson: 

Evan-Moor, Building Spelling Skills: Amazon Link

Answer Key:

(Word Study) waist – ai, plague – a, straight – ai, freight – eigh, agent – a, acre – a, mayor – a, obey – ey, restrain – ai, campaign – ai, persuade – a, survey – ey, anticipate – a, famous – a

(Rhyme) waist, straight, freighter, persuade

(Syllable)

  1. fra/gile
  2. sur/vey
  3. cam/paign
  4. re/frain
  5. o/bey
  6. a/gent
  7. fa/mous 
  8. a/cre

 

(Editing Worksheet)
Circle: aunt, survey, axle, famous, persuade, campaign, plague, aptitude, fragile, acre, obey anticipate
Misspelled words: 1. persuade, aunt, campaign 2. famous, mayor, obey 3. agent, survey, waist 4. fragile, straight, waist

(Crossword)
Across: 1. restrain 3. freighter 4. mayor 7. straight 8. obey 10. agent 11. persuade
Down: 3. anticipate 3. fragile 5. acre 6. aptitude 7. survey 9. waist 10. axel 

 

 

 

Sixth-Grade Resource Books

Below is a compiled list of books for your sixth-grader. You don’t have to purchase all the books, just giving you options! 

If your child is in another grade, you can easily find their appropriate grade level on Amazon as well. I’m only sharing sixth-grade learning resources because that’s the grade I’ll be teaching this school year (20-21).  

Remember: You don’t have to purchase all the books, just giving you options! 

 

Evan-Moor, Building Spelling Skills: Amazon Link
Evan-Moor, 
6-Trait Writing: Amazon Link
Evan-Moor, Paragraph Editing: Amazon Link
Evan-Moor, Reading Comprehension: Amazon Link
Evan-Moor, 
Daily Higher-Order Thinking: Amazon Link

 

McGraw-Hill Education, Vocabulary (Grades 6-8): Amazon Link
McGraw-Hill Education, Math: Amazon Link

 

Argo Brothers, Common Core Math – Multiple Choice & Video Explanations: Amazon Link

Argo Brothers, Introducing MATH! Grade 6 by ArgoPrep: 600+ Practice Questions + Comprehensive Overview of Each Topic + Detailed Video Explanations Included | 6th Grade Math Workbook: Amazon Link

 

Shell Education – 180 Days of Sixth Grade Practice, 6th Grade Workbook Set for Ages 10-12, Includes 5 Assorted Sixth Grade Workbooks to Practice Math, Reading, Grammar, … Problem Solving Skills (180 Days of Practice): Amazon Link

(Note: You can purchase each Shell Education book separately. The link above is for the bundle pack.) 

 

Lumos Learning, Common Core Practice – 6th Grade English Language Arts: Workbooks to Prepare for the PARCC or Smarter Balanced Test: CCSS Aligned (CCSS Standards Practice) (Volume 7): Amazon Link

Lumos Learning, Common Core Practice – Grade 6 Math: Workbooks to Prepare for the PARCC or Smarter Balanced Test: CCSS Aligned (CCSS Standards Practice) (Volume 8): Amazon Link

 

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace English Language Arts in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace World History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace Math in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

Workman Publishing, Everything You Need to Ace Computer Science and Coding in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide (Big Fat Notebooks): Amazon Link

 

Awesome Robotics Projects for Kids: 20 Original STEAM Robots and Circuits to Design and Build (Awesome STEAM Activities for Kids): Amazon Link

 

I’m only homeschooling one child, so the planner below works for my needs. If you’re in the same situation, maybe it’ll work for you as well.

Amazon Link

 

Know your rights!

All the information on this page is taken directly from ISBE website.  This information will apply to the 20-21 school year. There’s no guarantee these guidelines will be the same next year, but for now, this is what we have to abide by. 

 

​I. You must provide instruction in the following subject areas:

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Biological and Physical Science
  • Social Science (Social Studies)
  • Fine Arts
  • Physical Development and Health

II. You must offer education that is at least equivalent to that which is offered in public schools.​

 

 
​The Illinois State Board of Education does not provide recommendations for materials or provide assistance with planning a home school curriculum. However, we have prepared a list of resources that may be helpful to view, if parents or guardians are unsure where to start.

 
​No. The state of Illinois does not require parents to register before they begin home schooling. The state does offer a voluntary registration process, which parents are encouraged to complete by filling out the following ISBE Home Schooling Registration Form.  There are no other forms, documents, or procedures required by the state of Illinois.
 
​While there is no formal procedure mandated by state law, parents or guardians should notify the public school of their intent to home school. Failure to do so may result in the public school marking the student absent and eventually referring the student to a truancy officer.

ISBE highly recommends that you give the public school a dated letter (keeping copies for your records) that state you will be withdrawing your student and intend to home school. We also recommend including a copy of the ISBE Home Schooling Registration Form along with your letter to show that you are aware of your obligations as a parent.

In addition to the public school, parents or guardians are encouraged to send the same letter and form to their Regional Office of Education. You can find your Regional Office of Education by searching for your County on the Region​al Office of Education Directory.​​​

 

 

No. If you choose to administer tests to assess academic progress you are not required to submit the results to any school official or state agency.​

 
 
 
​If you decide to re-enroll the student in public school after a period of home schooling, the public school enrolling the student will make a determination of grade placement. The school may administer a test to the student or ask for proof of the material covered during the period of home schooling. ISBE highly recommends that parents keep in close communication with the public district in which they intend to enroll or re-enroll the student. By doing so, you can ensure that your child will be ready for whatever assessment will be used and therefore placed in the grade level that matches the student’s academic ability. Moreover, for high school students entering a public school it is critical that parents can demonstrate proof that a student has earned credits during the home school process for classes required for graduation.

Finally, parents or guardians should know their rights in grade placement. A district may not make a placement decision that is unreasonable or arbitrary. For example, a public school cannot require a home school program to be “registered” or “recognized” through the State Board of Education since the School Code excludes home schools from this voluntary process. A method of grade placement (such as the use of contemporary testing) that treats all students in the same way whether entering from nonpublic schools in Illinois or from public and nonpublic schools in other states would be a reasonable policy for a district to adopt.​

 
​In a 1950 decision of the Illinois Supreme Court, People v. Levisen, the Court held that home-schooling could be considered private schooling if the teacher were competent, the required subjects were taught, and the student received an education at least equivalent to public schooling. As a result, home schooling is considered to be a form of private education in the State of Illinois.

Parents or guardians who choose to educate their children at home are under a legal obligation to meet the minimum requirements stated in Illinois’ Compulsory Attendance Law (Section 26-1 of the Illinois School Code). Parents who choose to educate their children at home are obligated to teach their children “…the branches of education taught to children of corresponding age and grade in the public schools” and they are further obligated to offer instruction in these core courses in the English language. The “branches of education” include language arts; mathematics; biological and physical sciences; social sciences; fine arts; and physical development and health.

Parents or guardians who permit a child to attend a home school that is up to the standard of Section 26-1, as interpreted by Levisen, are free to decide the manner, time and materials which best suit the learning needs of their children. Parents may determine what type of home-schooling curriculum is best for their students, what materials to use, how much homework to assign, how homework is to be assessed, and what records of the student’s accomplishments should be kept.

While the law affords Illinois parents a great degree of latitude in designing and/or choosing a program of home education that best meets the needs of their children, it also has the effect of placing near-total responsibility on parents for their student’s education while they are being home-schooled. In a 1974 decision, a federal district court stated that under Illinois law the burden of proof rests with parents to establish that the plan of home instruction which they are providing to their children meets state requirements.

The regional superintendent of schools for the student’s county of residence has first-line responsibility for investigating reports of noncompliance with the compulsory attendance laws found in Article 26 of the Illinois School Code. In fulfilling this legal responsibility, regional superintendents may expect the parents who seek to educate their children at home to establish, when necessary, that they are providing instruction that is at least commensurate with the standards established for public schools. With evidence that home instruction in a specific instance does not satisfy the requirements of state law, the regional superintendent may request the regional or school district truant officer to investigate to see that the child is in compliance with the compulsory attendance law. Truant officers are peace officers empowered to conduct investigations, enforce the compulsory attendance law and to refer matters of noncompliance to the courts. A parent who allows a child to attend a home school that does not comply with the standard of Section 26-1, as interpreted by Levisen, allows the child to be truant and can be found to have committed a Class C misdemeanor.​